Standard Oil White Crown Sign - VS074


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White Crown Standard Oil Sign

This original Standard Oil gasoline White Crown sign is from the 1950s and was used as an advertising sign for an old gas pump. This is a genuine single sided, porcelain gas sign on a white background, with the red, white, and blue Standard Oil torch logo, with Standard White Crown font in red with a blue outline color scheme. Bottom corners read "AD3-804" and "I.R.-8-51".

Condition - Original, as is, see photos - not restored, and not a reproduction sign. Dimensions - 15"T x 12"W


Old signs vintage Americana advertisement for Standard Oil White Crown gas manufactured by Standard Oil of Indiana founded in 1889, renamed Amoco in 1956.

This Standard White Crown sign features a porcelain rectangle sign, with the Standard Oil torch logo in red, white, and blue logo (15" x 12"). This vintage gas pump sign for White Crown gasoline has not been restored, and is sold in original, as-is condition from Scottsdale Art Factory. Contact us to order vintage signs, antique gas pumps, and classic Americana at 1-800-292-0008.

All vintage memorabilia offered is a genuine collectable and appreciable assets, not a fake reproduction. All items are fine collectable art at the highest world class collector level.

Gas Pump Sign Specifications:

  • Type: Porcelain Sign
  • Company: Standard Oil
  • Product: White Crown Premium Gasoline
  • Era: 1930s-50s
  • Color: White, red, and blue
  • Dimensions: 15" tall x 12" wide
  • Sign Manufacturer: Ingram-Richardson - Beaver Falls, PA
  • Condition: Original, as-is, see photos for details

Vintage Collectables and Classic Restorations information:


Collectable Vintage Signs

Due to our earned reputation, we have the good fortune to be in high demand by collectors. We always have a waiting list for most items. We suggest if you are looking for a specific collectable, please ask to be placed on our first-come, first-served list. (Refundable deposit required.) Call us at 1-800-292-0008.


Standard Oil - Gas Company History

Standard Oil Co. Inc. was an American oil producing, transporting, refining, and marketing company. Established in 1870 as a corporation in Ohio, it was the largest oil refiner in the world. Its controversial history as one of the world's first and largest multinational corporations ended in 1911, when the United States Supreme Court ruled that Standard was an illegal monopoly. John D. Rockefeller was a founder, chairman and major shareholder. With the dissolution of the Standard Oil trust into 33 smaller companies, Rockefeller became the richest man in the world.

Standard Oil (Indiana) was formed in 1889 by John D. Rockefeller as part of the Standard Oil trust. In 1910, with the rise in popularity of the automobile, Indiana Standard decided to specialize in providing gasoline to consumers. In 1911, the year it became independent from the Standard Oil trust, the company sold 88% of the gasoline and kerosene sold in the Midwest. In 1912 it opened its first gas service station in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Amoco Corporation, originally Standard Oil Company (Indiana), was a global chemical and oil company that was founded in 1889 around a refinery located in Whiting, Indiana, United States. It later absorbed the American Oil Company, founded in Baltimore in 1910 and incorporated in 1922.

While most oil companies were switching to leaded gasolines en masse during the mid-to-late 1920s, American Oil chose to continue marketing its premium-grade "Amoco-Gas" (later Amoco Super-Premium) as a lead-free gasoline by using aromatics rather than tetraethyllead to increase octane levels, decades before the environmental movement of the early 1970s led to more stringent auto emission controls which ultimately mandated the universal phase out of leaded gasoline. The "Amoco" lead-free gasoline was sold at American's stations in the eastern and southern U.S. alongside American Regular gasoline, which was a leaded fuel. Lead-free Amoco was introduced in the Indiana Standard marketing area in 1970. The Red Crown Regular and White Crown Premium (later Gold Crown Super Premium) gasolines marketed by parent company Standard Oil (Indiana) in its prime marketing area in the Midwest before 1961 also contained lead.

Ing-Rich Manufacturing Company

Louis Ingram and Ernest Richardson turned the struggling Enameled Iron Company of Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania into a porcelain-enamel super company in 1901. The two men from England manufactured signs for steets, oil, soap, ice cream, and panels for table tops, stove parts, refrigerators, and other signs and household products. The Ing-Rich porcelain signs are sometime identified with the I.R. mark.

Source: wikipedia.org


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