Dog Brand Oil - Early 1900's - LSS365


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Americana For Sale- Early 1900's - This Is A Vintage Dog linseed Oil Sign - Genuine - Condition As Shown . (Please Read History At Bottom Of This Page ) - Size 24" wide x 12'' tall. One Only.

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We Build Complete Vintage Filling Stations, Soda Fountains, Drive Ins And Many Other Authentic In Every Detail Display Sets In Any Era You Wish To Display. We Pre Fab Entire Free Standing Full Function Historical Sets In Full Detail For - Store Fronts - Your Favorite Hang Out - Outdoor Or Indoor Displays To Fit Any Specifications. Simply Send Us Your Photos, Drawings Or Description And We Will Build To Your Specifications.

Designs By H J Nick and Scottsdale Art Factory a handmade in America custom manufacturer is based in Scottsdale Arizona has been designing building and restoring some of the worlds finest Antiques, and Fine Art furniture for some of the world's finest designers with ordinary clients as well as most prominent and successful Persons,C.E.O.'s, leaders, royalty and celebrities for the last 98 years. Most of our clients want finished product that has a BIG WOW factor and elegance. All want investment value and quality that makes a proper statement reflecting their personality or the personality of the environment for which it is intended.

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Restoring American History One Item At A Time - Since 1913.
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We Buy Old Gas Pumps And Vintage Petroleum Memorabilia - Any Condition - Cash - We Pick Up Or Ship World Wide.

We Are One Of The Worlds Foremost Fine Art Furniture, Door, And Hardware Manufacturers And Antique Restorers. With A Large Classically Trained Work Force in Metal Working, Wood Working, Leather and Upholstery, Glass, Stone And Mechanical Repair. This Allows Us To Work In The Same Hand And Materials As Our Forefathers Such As Thomas Chippendale (english furniture builder), George Hepplewhite (english furniture builder), Stephen's Brothers (boat builders), H. A. Moyer (carriage builders) Gustav Stickley (American Manufacturer) To Mention A Few Of The Finest.

No matter The Era. This Attention To Detail And Fine Art Craftsmanship Allows Us To Restore Your Collector Antique Furnishing, Artifact Or 50's Coke Machine To The Highest Quality That Can Be Achieved To A World Class Collectors Standard.


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Interesting Historical Facts

Linseed oil, also known as flax seed oil, is a clear to yellowish oil obtained from the dried ripe seeds of the flax plant (Linum usitatissimum, Linaceae). The oil is obtained by cold pressing, sometimes followed by solvent extraction.


Linseed oil is a "drying oil", as it can polymerize into a solid form. Due to its polymer-forming properties, linseed oil is used on its own or blended with other oils, resins, and solvents as an impregnator and varnish in wood finishing, as a pigment binder in oil paints, as a plasticizer and hardener in putty and in the manufacture of linoleum.


The use of linseed oil has declined over the past several decades with the increased use of synthetic alkyd resins, which are functionally similar but resist yellowing.[1] It is an edible oil but, because of its strong flavor and odor, is only a minor constituent of human nutrition in the U.S., although it is marketed as a nutritional supplement. In parts of Europe, it is traditionally eaten with potatoes and quark (cheese). It is regarded as a delicacy due to its hearty taste, which spices the bland quark.


Linseed oil is a triglyceride, like other fats. Linseed oil is distinctive in terms of fatty acid constituents of the triglyceride, which contain an unusually large amount of α-linolenic acid, which has a distinctive reaction toward oxygen in air. Specifically, the constituent fatty acids in a typical linseed oil are of the following types:

The triply unsaturated α-linolenic acid (51.9-55.2%),
The saturated acids palmitic acid (about 7%) and stearic acid (3.4-4.6%),
The monounsaturated oleic acid (18.5-22.6%),
The doubly unsaturated linoleic acid (14.2-17%).

Having a high content of di- and triunsaturated esters, linseed oil is particularly susceptible to polymerization reactions upon exposure to oxygen in air. This polymerization, which is called "drying," results in the rigidification of the material. The drying process can be so exothermic as to pose a fire hazard under certain circumstances. To prevent premature drying, linseed oil-based products (oil paints, putty) should be stored in air-tight containers.

Representative triglyceride found in a linseed oil, a triester derived (from the top) of linoleic acid, alpha-linolenic acid, and oleic acid. [edit]Uses

Most applications of linseed oil exploit its drying properties, i.e. the initial material is liquid or at least pliable and the aged material is rigid but not brittle. The water-repelling (hydrophobic) nature of the resulting hydrocarbon-based material is advantageous.


Paint binder Linseed oil is a common carrier used in oil paint. It can also be used as a painting medium, making oil paints more fluid, transparent and glossy. It is available in varieties such as cold pressed, alkali refined, sun bleached, sun thickened, and polymerised (stand oil). The introduction of linseed oil was a significant advance in the technology of oil painting.


PuttyTraditional glazing putty, consisting of a paste of chalk powder and linseed oil, is a sealant for glass windows that hardens within a few weeks of application and can then be painted over. The utility of putty is owed to the drying properties of linseed oil.


Wood finish When used as a wood finish, linseed oil dries slowly and shrinks little upon hardening. Linseed oil does not cover the surface as varnish does, but soaks into the (visible and microscopic) pores, leaving a shiny but not glossy surface that shows off the grain of the wood. A linseed oil finish is easily repaired, but it provides no significant barrier against scratching. Only wax finishes are less protective. Liquid water will penetrate a linseed oil finish in mere minutes and water vapour bypasses it almost completely.[4] Garden furniture treated with linseed oil may develop mildew. Oiled wood may be yellowish and is likely to darken with age.


Linseed oil is a traditional finish for gun stocks. A very fine finish may require months to obtain. Several coats of linseed oil is the traditional protective coating for the raw willow wood of cricket bats. Linseed oil is also often used by billiards or pool cue-makers for cue shafts, as a lubricant/protectant for wooden recorders, and used in place of epoxy to seal modern wooden surfboards.

Additionally, a luthier may use linseed oil when reconditioning a guitar, mandolin, or other stringed instrument's fret board; lemon-scented mineral oil is commonly used for cleaning, then a light amount of linseed oil (or other drying oil) is applied to protect it from grime that might otherwise result in accelerated deterioration of the wood.

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