Antler Chandelier - Natural Fallow Deer Europe - LA700

Call for Price 1-800-292-0008

Get a Quote

See Movie Tour Our Factory & World-Class Showroom

Fallow deer are a breed of deer that originated in Eurasia, but now are found all over the world. Their antlers are well suited to be used in home decor and lighting because of the long, flat, and narrow shape. H. J. Nick saw the potential and beauty of these antlers and used them to create this large 6' x 6' antler chandelier.

Deer Antler Chandeliers

Using only naturally shed, cruelty-free antlers, our master craftsmen carefully sort and match all the antlers for each chandelier, making sure that the color and gloss will be consistent through the whole piece. After our master blacksmiths have hand forged the wrought iron frame, chain, and ceiling cap, these same craftsmen attach the antlers in a way that hides the frame and then wire the chandelier internally to UL standards. Candelabra sockets are added to make the chandelier glow warmly when illuminated. Making the most of the beautiful fallow deer antlers, H. J. Nick celebrates the beauty of nature and shares it with you to complete your rustic home decor.

Custom Lighting & Furnishings

Custom Antler Lighting - Historical Origin And Design Inspiration

The Fallow Deer (Dama dama) is a ruminant mammal belonging to the family Cervidae. The male is a buck, the female is a doe, and the young a fawn. Bucks are 140-160 cm long and 90-100 cm shoulder height, and 60-85 kg in weight; does are 130-150 cm long and 75-85 cm shoulder height, and 30-50 kg in weight. Fawns are born in spring at about 30 cm and weigh around 4.5 kg. The life span is around 12-16 years. All of the Fallow deer have white spots on their backs, and black tips at the ends of their tails.

The species is very variable in colour, with four main variants, "common", "menil", "melanistic" and "albinistic". The common form has a brown coat with white mottles that are most pronounced in summer with a much darker coat in the winter. The albinistic is the lightest coloured, almost white; common and menil are darker, and melanistic is very dark, even black (easily confused with the Sika Deer). Most herds consist of the common form but have menil form and melanistic form animals amongst them (the three groups do not stay separate and interbreed readily).

Only bucks have antlers, these are broad and shovel-shaped. They are grazing animals; their preferred habitat is mixed woodland and open grassland. During the rut bucks will spread out and females move between them, at this time of year fallow deer are relatively ungrouped compared to the rest of the year when they try to stay together in groups of up to 150.

Deer communicate in many different ways including sounds, scent and marking. All deer are capable of producing audible noises, unique to each animal. Fawns release a high pitched squeal, known as a bleat, to call out to their mothers. Does also bleat, as well as grunt. Grunting produces a low, guttural sound that will attract the attention of any other deer in the area. Both does and bucks snort, a sound that often signals danger. As well as snorting, bucks also grunt at a pitch thats gets lower with maturity. Bucks are unique, however, in their grunt-snort-wheeze pattern that often shows aggression and hostility.

Antlered deer possess many glands that allow them to produce scents, some of which are so potent they can be detected by the human nose. Three major glands are the orbital, tarsal and metatarsal glands. Orbital glands are found on the head, and scent is deposited from them by rubbing the head, often the area around the eyes, on hanging twigs. The tarsal glands are found on the lower outside of each hind leg. Scent is deposited from these glands when deer walk through and rub against vegetation. The metatarsal glands, found on the inside "knee" of each hind leg, are the most potent.

During the first year the pedicles appear on the young deer's forehead. The following year, the youngster sprouts straight, spike-like shafts, and in the third year, the first branch appears. In successive years, as the deer matures, his antlers lengthen and, in most species, he acquires additional branches. One can actually determine the age of the deer from the number of branches on his antlers, as their number increases with age.

Custom Hand Crafted Doors and Furniture information request